I’ve been meaning to do this for a while…

Earlier this year I received some sample golf balls from Vision Golf. Boz, the founder, is an Aussie who is taking on the big guys head on. I reckon he is doing something great here and the product is top notch.

The golf balls are bright colours and have a big number on them. Boz can tell you more about them here, but performance wise they stack up. Give them a go if you want to try something new and innovative.

The Vision Golf Ball

In the spirit of this blog I thought it would be good to offer these balls to you guys. And the best way to do that is to get you to earn them. So here’s my plan.

Let’s have an Ask Cameron blog post. You get to ask me any golf question that you want answered. Get creative and specific because I’ll award the best (I’m the judge) questions a pack of Vision Golf Balls. Best of all I’ll answer the questions below.

The aim is to turn this into an informative post, help out the guys at Vision Golf and give you guys the chance to win some new golf balls.

All you have to do is come up with ONE question and post it in the comments section below. Keep your eyes peeled for my replies.

Go for it, enter your question below.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

Grayden Provis - June 11, 2010

I second this motion. I love these golf balls. And the service you get from Boz is fantastic. I used the bright yellow Vision ball once and I was hooked. I’ve now got a truckload of them and don’t use anything else. Don’t assume its like all those other coloured balls out there. Its not. Completely different. You have to actually see one to know what I mean. It also plays beautifully and gives you one less stress to worry about on the course when you can spot your ball a mile off in the rough! Great product. Buy some and enjoy the Boz experience. You get a great little pack with all sorts of goodies in it. And it all turns up on your door step the next day! (depending on where you live of course)

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Steve Griffiths - June 11, 2010

I often find myself playing automatically and setting up a good round but for some reason around holes 12-14 I start thinking. I then tend to start hitting a few inches behind the ball and the frustration kicks in. I’ve tried a few things, like singing to myself to try and block out the negative thoughts. I’m currently playing off 10 and feel I have the ability to go lower. Any help would be most appreciated.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Steve: You need to stick to what got you to the 12th hole in good shape. The tendency is to change and over think on the last few holes. Fight this urge, relax and keep swinging freely. It’s really al yo can do. There’s is no magic cure for this. It sounds easy and it is – it’s also easy to go back into bad habits and try and control the situation.

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Vincent Johnson - June 11, 2010

Cameron
I have a problem when driving that I dont slice the ball but I tend to “block” the ball to the right. Ive tried to “hood” the club but of course this tends more to bring about a slice or even a duck hook shot !
Any suggestions ???
Cheers

Vince J

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Vince J: The easiest method is to accept that you have a slight block. Allow for it when you play. Aim a little left and make your best swing. I’d be surprised if this didn’t help right away. Too many of us aim straight expecting something different to happen – it rarely does. Part of playing your best golf is accepting your limitations and your natural shot. Let me know how this goes.

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Juan Gutierrez - June 11, 2010

Everyone says you have to practice putting to get your scores down. I agree, however, what specific drills do you recommend, and how do keep my attention… I mean I get bored practicing right now and can only stay focused for about 15-20 minutes

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @JG: I don’t think you should be spending more than 20 minutes on the practice green. 5-10 minutes is more than enough. A good drill is to use one ball and replicate what you’re doing on the course. Always helps to spend a minute or two on the short ones too. Once practice gets boring you should stop, go and play or do something else.

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Scotso - June 11, 2010

I am frustrated with my sand bunker play. There was a time when i felt I had the right open stance with the club face well open weight on left leg and I would be able to get the ball relatively close to the hole. I played the shot with locked wrist.
Recently I am playing 2 or 3 shots in the bunker wiping the hole

Help!!!!!

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Scotso: You are too tight and thinking too much. Stop analysing so much. It is not an exact science. Get into the bunker, aim to hit behind the ball with an open face and that’s it. The ball should come out every time. All the worry and thinking is definitely not helping you.

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Neale Coulch - June 11, 2010

I have problems with consistency in my takeaway. Is there a finger clue/drill that will ensure a consistent takeaway?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Neale C: The take away is a minor part of the swing. it really doesn’t need much attention. If you’re playing automatically your take away will be perfect all of the time anyway. For example, would you focus you attention on your take away when you toss a ball to someone? Or would you throw the ball to your target? Forget about your takeaway and you’ll play more consistently. Let me know how this goes.

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Richard - June 11, 2010

What is the only shot in golf where you don’t actually HIT the ball??

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Richard: Interesting. I can think of three shots. 1. green side bunker shots. 2. shots from really deep and thick rough. 3. shots from water. All of these shots the club doesn’t strike the ball.

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Philip Eltringham - June 11, 2010

Cameron, I’ve developed a reasonably reliable swing based on past information from you. My handicap is 10 and I play close to it most of the time. This is the problem. I cannot play consistently for 18 holes so most of the time I’m a couple of shots short of my handicap and occasional everything comes together and I’ll have a win. How can I develop more consistency and correct small faults in my swing as soon as they occur rather than after playing several holes?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Philip E: Sounds like you’re close to automatic. But thoughts about fixing your swing during play will hurt you because we don’t perform the golf swing consciously. Thoughts like this are best for after the game. You need to stick to your routine for the duration. Keep swinging freely and trust your subconscious. You may also need to adjust your game plan – maybe you need to choose shots you really know you can hit successfully? Don’t hit those that are a maybe.

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Ian Brice - June 11, 2010

It took a while from the time I started reading your notes, but suddenly… no pesky, relaxed as hell, chipping dead, driving straight, 2 rounds 75 and 77 off my 14 handicap. Cameron the question is how do I keep it going?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Ian B: Keep doing what you’re doing. Why would you change now? The adult mind is a hard thing to keep under control – it’s always looking for a solution even though the solution is smacking it in the face. Please, just keep following the process – there’s nothing else you need to do.

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Ed Murphy - June 11, 2010

I wonder why so few people choose to use yellow golf balls. For me they are much more easy to see. If his ball by Vision Golf is good i would be glad to buy them after I try some. Can you make this happen?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Ed M: I need a better question than that to consider you for a ball.

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David - June 11, 2010

There are a handful of holes at my home course that I usually play badly. They are not necesarilly the hardest holes on the course, but it seems no matter how well I feel Im playing, I always seem to play these holes badly. I have tried playing these holes a number of different ways.. to no avail. I am now thinking that because of the bad memories I have everytime I set up for these holes, it is affecting the way I swing the club.

Do you have any suggestions or strageies of how to get rid of bad memories on particular holes??

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated,

thanks,
Dave F

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @David F: My strategy is this. You need to work out what needs to be done. Then you choose a club to do that and then you have to have to courage to step up to the ball and let it rip. There is nothing else you can do. My experience on certain holes causing problems is this.

    Golfers choose a shot that has little chance of success. When they should be playing conservatively they hit an aggressive shot. The best solution is to take the smallest club you’re confident with and make the best automatic swing you can.

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Trevor Freeman - June 11, 2010

Is it best, or the correct way, to play chip shots off the front foot. Trevor

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Trevor f: always chip from the back foot. This makes it easier to avoid duff shots. The better you become the more you can experiment with moving the ball forward.

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Steve - June 11, 2010

I have lost the ability to stay focused under even the slightest pressure. I used to play at a very high competitive level and felt like I used to thrive on the first tee or when a good shot had to be hit. My game has fallen since making life choices (read: kids), but mostly in the playing of the round. Even today, 15 years removed from when I played professionally, I still have excellent range skills and my warmups are sometimes even better than when I warmed up as a professional. However, with the slightest pressure (even just the first tee), I hit shots that I cannot even repeat on the range when trying. Blocks way right, snap hooks left — you name it. I feel like I have become a mental failure and need so guidance. So, do you have any guidance?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Steve: You need to read the articles on this blog. I have over 300 articles which will help you. The problems you’re talking about are the same things I used to suffer with. I’m sure you can regain and even overtake your previous form – you don’t lose your skill level because of walking onto the golf course.

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Garry Harrison - June 11, 2010

I have been playing golf for 50 years and when i was younger i got down to 5 hcp now i am on 14 hcp .What i want to know is there any drill that can make me swing slower ,i have always had a fast swing and been able to get away with it but now at 65 i cant seem to find any rythmn,i swing back fast and find my body doesnt know where it is when i am coming down on the ball…..how can i learn to swing slower ?
After reading and looking at your video’s I believe in what you say ,when i first played golf i reduced my hcp very quickly because it was my natural swing then i got to a low hcp and started confusing myself with all the technics in golf magazines and virtually altered my natural swing now i don’t seem to have any consistent swing at all …HELP.ONE VERY FRUSTRATED GOLFER.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Gary H: you need to stop thinking so much about your golf swing. Forget about swinging too fast or anything else. These are the thoughts that are holding you back. Time to get out there and play how you really want. You have the skill and you don’t lose it – the first step is to stop trying and thinking so much. The game is fun, start playing.

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ray cashmore - June 11, 2010

Hi Cameron

I need to do the following things to improve my golfing experience: stop losing my treasured marker coin in the club’s sand box on the first tee when tossing for honour, stop (mistakenly) thinking that after a hitting my ball about 170 metres over a blind hill into wild and woolly terrain, that the ball I discovered sitting fair-square in the middle of an up-turned and “lost” sand bucket was a ball actually belonging to the person who dropped the sand bucket (I had to incur a penalty for picking up my very own ball out of the sand bucket – how it stopped in the sand I’ll never know) and finally, stop playing my opponent’s ball on the very next hole as I was still recounting the “bucket” story from the previous hole. Do I need help? Yes, but all these things have happened to me recently. What a game!!

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Ray Cashmore: nice one!

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Peter Hawke - June 11, 2010

Lob Wedge

Is a 14 handicapper capable of using this “bloody” club from close in – say within 40 metres of the green?
From 80 metres out – full swing – no problems. Less than 50 metres out – bunker to clear – reduced swing – hopeless!!!
Any suggestions?

Peter Hawke

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Peter H: of course you can. It’s not an easy shot and maybe you should choose a shot you have more confidence in. WIth more practice comes confidence. The trick is to play these shots like you are a master and to avoid getting distracted by fear.

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BB - June 11, 2010

Solve this one, even partly, and you will make a huge impression on many golfers

Most high to medium handicap golfers will , at some stage, in just about any round of golf, lift their head and take their eyes off the ball, resulting in bad shots. With the high handicap golfers this is very common and probably the main reason why they play above their handicaps so often. I know this because I am a high handicapper and I play with other high handicappers twice a week .
Any magic thoughts would help

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @BB: Easy. By playing automatically you naturally will get into the shot. You’ll have better mechanics and way better concentration. The best thing is you’ll play consistently and not be a high handicapper for long. The trouble is that golfers are looking for “magic” and not putting trust in their own system.

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Barry - June 11, 2010

Cameron

thank your your encouragement after my thumb reconstruction. Things are improving. My wife had cateract surgery a while ago and always plays in sunglasses even in winter. She struggles seeing the balls in the air and looses quite a few. She tried coloured balls but didn’t like the feel. Would these vision balls help her.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Barry: I can’t answer that for sure but give Boz a hoy and he’ll have all your answers.

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Troy M - June 11, 2010

Hi Camern

After much practice I have seen major improvements in my putting using your ebook methods, and have found my weakness has now become my strength. My question is I still struggle to read unfamiliar greens in terms of which way they run etc. I tend to rely on watching other players put first as you can imagine this is a hit and miss method. Its like others can see something I cant?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Troy: you can’t be that good on new greens. You need to give yourself time to learn. I’m also a believer that your subconscious knows enough to be dangerous. So don’t stress too much, look at your target and putt that ball. You might just surprise yourself.

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Dave - June 11, 2010

I was told that when driving it is a good drill to step forward with the right foot to ensure that all your weight is transferred to your left foot (right handed) is this true ??

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Dave: not sure about this one. I don’t think this would be all that useful. A great drill is to throw your club. That teaches you everything you need to know.

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Mal Jarvis - June 11, 2010

I AM A VERY WRISTY ARMEY PLAYER. – SOMETIMES CALLED A “SLAPPER” WHILE i CAN HIT ABOUT 200 METRES i AM TOLD IF i PIVOTED AROUND MY STERNUM, KEPT MY ARMS , STRAIGHTER, STOOD UP TALLER AND FOLLOWED RIGHT THROUGH I COULD ADD 30 – 50 METRES TO MY DRIVE.

mY QUESTION IS WHAT SPECIFIC TRAINING SKILLS COULD i USE TO FOLLOW THROUGH TO THE FRONT BETTER KEEPING MY ARMS STRAIGHT SO I COMPLETE A TOTAL ARC. I AM GOOD ON THE BACK SWING BUT HAVE TROUBLE MOVING MY WEIGHT THROUGH CONSISTENTLY..

MAL J (NZ)

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @ Mal J: please please please don’t fall for the trap of this thinking. Way too many things going on here. It seems like the right thing to do but it isn’t. No one is capable of thinking like this and being any good. Learn to throw the club down the fairway is the simplest and most effective training drill.

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Mal Jarvis - June 11, 2010

New to golf I like your comments about just being yourself and have trust in what comes naturally

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Geoff Evans - June 11, 2010

Dear Cam,
A fairly well controlled draw & straight shots with the odd too much draw plus the odd duck hook in the one round.What do you suggest, besides seeing a shrink.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Geoff E: You will always hit poor shots. It would be crazy to destroy your game because of the odd poor shot. I know so many golfers that have horrible games because they are scared of hitting a bad shot. Don’t let this happen to you – keep swinging like you own the course and you’ll play far better than you thought imaginable. And those bad shots will appear less and less.

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Ray Crick - June 11, 2010

Hello Cam,
Mine is a more a mental question-recently I have been suffering from really bad nervous tension before I start my round. Last round I tried to work on walking onto the first hole as if I was walking onto the last hole. Is there any specific mental or physical exercise you recommend before you start your round?

Regards
Ray C

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Ray C: These little mind games are hard to make work consistently. The point is that nerves are normal and you can play with nerves. Don’t try and fight it – accept that it is ok and play the best that you can. Don’t change your game because of a little tension – embrace it and you’ll do just fine.

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Trent Collins - June 11, 2010

Hi Cameron,

Me and a couple of mates try and plan a golf trip overseas each year where we treat ourselves to a few much nicer (and more difficult) courses than we normally do here at home. When we get to challenging holes such as par three island greens or par threes with lots of water in play, they always reach into their bags and pull out “water balls”. Basically, they pull out an old range ball to eliminate the chance of putting their expensive ball in the drink. I’ve been trying to avoid doing this, believing that it’s better to stay positive and not contemplate the thought of going in the water. I’ve still lost a few $$ worth of good balls to the water gods and copped a lot of flak from my mates. It’s even worse when two consecutive shots go in the plonk. Should I just be more sensible and use an old ball when facing this situation or do I stick to my guns and keep playing my more expensive game ball?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Trent: I personally wouldn’t change my ball. A challenging shot is what makes the game so much fun. I would embrace those tough shots and go for it. Those crappy balls don’t fly properly anyway, they have more chance of finding trouble than a nice new ball. Tell you mates to man up too 🙂 In my group if someone did this they would be in all sorts of trouble.

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Malcolm Kates - June 11, 2010

How do you get the ball to draw or fade?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Malcolm K: It’s a matter of putting side spin on the ball. When you keep the objective simple you give yourself a better chance of success – too many golfers try and control 24 things with their swing – this makes controlling the golf swing hard.

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Rob - June 11, 2010

I have been studying Hogan’s swing for almost two years now and it has been a blessing. However in Golf magazine’s and with a few local players I see a big difference in my swing versus theirs. At the top of my backswing my right elbow is pointing at the ground and only about 6″- 8″ from my body. These guys have their elbow straight out with the humerus bone parallel to the ground. When I attempt this I loss control of the club. I’m I missing out on an important part of the swing by not allowing my elbow to float up and away from my body in my backswing? Thanks Cameron, for all your help and insights.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Rob: Let me ask you a question. If you’re hitting the ball well and scoring great do you care where your elbow points? I wouldn’t concern yourself with this type of thing. Most of the time they are for selling golf magazines – not really helping golfers. I made the biggest leap in my game by ignoring others and playing golf my way – I suggest you do the same.

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Harry Duncan - June 11, 2010

You have said the golf swing is a throwing action and the science proves it. Fred Shoemaker has 100s of videos of high handicappers throwing clubs. In these they have an excellent golfing action.

How can we access this throwing action for training and how can we use it when a ball is present. I would love to here your views on this.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Harry: Do it. Get out there and explore this. I wrote a detailed article about this a while ago. Many golfers think about it and and can sort of relate. But only those that get out there and try it really know what it means. So stop thinking and start throwing. It’s not a hard drill but one that is worth while. If Fred Shoemaker suggests it then every golfer should spend a few minutes finding out what it’s all about.

    The first step is to start. Your system will do the rest for you.

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Maurie - June 11, 2010

Cam
.There is a hole that always give me trouble 16th hole par 3. The 15th is a par 5
usual score 5- somtimes 6. Other par 3 no the course I play OK
I find it very hard to produce a shot that is between clubs, full swing OK Need some help please

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Maurie: You need to choose a shot that suits you. Some holes suit and others don’t. The trick is to play a club and shot you’re comfortable with and don’t change your routine/strategy when playing holes you don’t like.

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Howe Allen - June 12, 2010

I have found cameron as you get older you need to still make a good shoulder turn but not to let your hands get to high (just past horizontal with the left arm) then this will keep your swing much more on plane with still very good impact with the ball.You surprisingly still hit the ball just as far and more fairways are hit so cam start spruiking mate and let the the converted in on this secret

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Danny - June 12, 2010

Hi Cameron
My question relates to playing well when carrying slight injuries. I have trouble with my left hip and whenever it flares a little i struggle to hit it solid. I know what I do wrong when its sore ( cant stay down on the shot ) but nothing I do seems to help. I try and stay in the same automatic routine but even if my swing doesn’t feel greatly effected by the hip I just don’t seem to be able to get it around. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Danny E: I have had a few injuries the last year or so. The first thing is do everything you can to fix them. The other thing is to rely on your automatic swing. This helps distracts you from the injury. The other thing is that I think automatic reduces the chance of injury because you’re not fighting your system but working with it.

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William Hoggard - June 12, 2010

Hi Cameron, My question is “How do you shank the ball on purpose ? Would be handy to get around trees etc!

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @William H: You never want to shank the ball. A shank is when the ball hits the shaft or the neck of the club. Not a good thing. The shot you’re talking about is a huge slice. To do this you need an open club face and an out to in swing. It a useful shot – so get out there and give it a try. This is a shot that I use a lot to get myself out of trouble.

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Grayden Provis - June 12, 2010

Did everyone spot the needle in the haystack?

“Keep swinging like you own the course…..”

Fear and timidity rule golf courses across the land. DECIDE it will no longer be you (no matter WHAT happens)

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Cameron - June 12, 2010

@Grayden: Yes, the message is really simple. It’s so simple that golfers miss the real meaning and end up wasting years by searching for other stuff. I certainly did – it took me years to work it out.

Cam

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Harry Banks - June 12, 2010

Cameron, question, course management. We all watch the pros and low market golfers have great course management during a round of golf. Teen age golfers and beginner golfers of say 2 years experience have no course management they try to hit the ball as far as they can and can’t work out why they can’t improve their score. What do you suggest of tips on course management for high handicap golfers?

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Harry B: you should always choose the shots you’re most confident in. I see too many golfers going for shots pros wouldn’t attempt. This takes some patience and requires the ego to be left in the car.

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Don Godfrey - June 12, 2010

Cameron
Have been doing the 3-5 round challenge with automatic golf, and have mixed results scorewise. I find that my golf is more consistent, but every round has a couple of holes that see me fall below my handicap. Is there a clue to the difference between automatic golf and “careless” golf. I am going to keep up singing my way around, because I leave the course a much happier person, and the feeling of failure any time I hit a poor shot has gone. Being somewhat of a perfectionist, ie anything could be done better, this alone has meant automatic golf is a real bonus.

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    Cameron - June 12, 2010

    @Don G: You’ve got to be careful not to expect too much from automatic. Golf is a difficult sport and no matter what you do, there will always be some bad shots/holes. So keep things in perspective.
    Automatic and careless: This is a good question. While you need to swing without a care in the world, automatic golf insists you plan what you want. Careless golf is more like hockey – slapping your way around the course without any strategy.

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Bernie Folkes - June 12, 2010

Hi Cam & all
It is really really wonderful how many have so far contributed to this post. To all the new faces – hi and welcome. Please keep contributing on a frequent basis. I have been following Cam for approx four months. During this time I have learnt so many “gems of wisdom” through his insights and the input of regular contributors.
I am not looking for a free ball. I am just interested in enjoying my golf, enjoying the environment (sounds, birds, plants etc) and learning to go “auto” as that I believe is my future golf wise. I also concur with my online mate, Grayden’s, words above.
To Cam and all. I wish you a happy life and good golfing.
Bernie

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Grayden Provis - June 12, 2010

Hi Don
I started off using counting as my strategy for going auto but like you am tending to use singing more these days. As a musician I find it works well for me. Apart from distracting me for the duration of the shot it has the added bonus of keeping me relaxed. I hadn’t really thought about the EXTRA bonuses you mention of leaving the course a happier person and the singing helping to dissipate any feelings of frustration but now that you mention it I reckon you’re right! Good insights. Thanks very much.

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Grayden Provis - June 13, 2010

I just read Don’s post again – a little more closely this time.

“… and the feeling of failure any time I hit a poor shot has gone”

“GONE”!…..not just “dissipated” as I suggested. Thats brilliant. You’re well and truly on the path to success if you’ve reached the level where you can simply “observe” your poor shots and not take them personally. You certainly WILL walk off the course a happier person when you can do this. And its the automatic approach that allows you to get into this happy state because it removes “you” from the process. “You” is no longer to blame. “You” is still an OK person even after your ball has sliced into the woods! Good work Don.

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Cameron - June 13, 2010

@ Grayden & Don: This could be the true benefit of playing automatically. You are no longer bound by rules and needing to know “why”. You can turn up and play, have fun and walk off the course content. It’s a great feeling and can only come to those that are prepared to take the leap. What I like is this can’t be bought from the pro-shop, you’ve got to earn it.

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Tim Pengilly - June 14, 2010

Hi Cameron,

More of a comment than a question. I love automatic golf, or as I call it “Play like you don’t care.” If something bad happens forget about it. I love watching people take the club back after a bad shot trying to work out what went wrong, the concentration is intense. They get tighter and tighter, you just know the next one is going to be just as bad. Hilarious stuff. Sat 12/6/10 I had someone trying to psych me out. I had hit a poor tee shot and he said “What happened there? Looked like you got a bit quick.” I replied “I dunno, I don’t care. I’ve already forgoten about it.” He soon shut up for the rest of the round. I went on to score 40 stableford points. Since I have been playing by your philosophies and have not been practicing at all because work has been busy I have improved my scores by 4 – 6 shots. When I was practicing flat out and really trying to improve I could not shoot better than 14 over. Now I walk out twice a month knowing I will never shoot worse than 16 over and I continually shoot 9 and 10 over each time. Now with some practice along with a relaxed attitude I reckon I can take the next step and get onto a single figure handicap. “Play like you don’t care!”

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    Cameron - June 15, 2010

    @ Tim: I had a long conversation with a golfing mate last night. He has become a recent convert to automatic golf and now can’t believe how hard he used to make it. Being a left brained person he would continually think about every shot and swing in lots of detail. End result? Golf was never that kind to him – lots of disappointment and frustration.

    He came up with something profound that has helped him get back on track. He now asks himself this question,

    How would I play golf if I didn’t know how to play?

    This gets him playing with a simple mind.

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David G - June 15, 2010

I have used the counting method putting and it is unbelievable. I had the opportunity to have my brain waves checked while counting and not counting. Incredibly enough the my brain was so relaxed during counting that it was almost a straight line.

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    Cameron - June 16, 2010

    @David G: Very interesting indeed. Thanks for posting.

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Kevin - June 15, 2010

Cameron
I have been playing golf for 35 years and play of a handicap of 9. Many years ago the putting yips hit me. It got so bad I stopped playing for a couple of years. When I came back to golf I tried many fixes including the long putter. Through practise and lessons I am now able to manage this problem. However over the past couple of years I developed another problem that I I have never seen discussed, the chipping yips. I know it sounds ridiculous but this problem is making me think about quitting the game again. From 30 metres and closer all I am aiming for is to get the ball on the green. Getting it close does not even enter my mind. Sometimes I hit the ball skinny, sometimes fat. I never know what I am going to get. I have tried chipping and running the ball with any club from a wedge to a 5 iron to a rescue club. I have tried many other ways of overcoming this problem.I have had many lessons, practised for hours and sought advice from our club champion who is brilliant around the greens. All to no avail. Do you have any suggestions that may help me save my game.
Regards
Kevin

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    Cameron - June 16, 2010

    @Kevin: The yips are no good at all. I think you need to relax a little and not try so hard. Yippers tend to do most other things well and then over complicate the things they yip on. When you get a chance you need to start working on a free flowing chipping style – get away from the course and start without any pressure. Slowly build up and make sure you automate it. It’s not an easy process but with commitment you can overcome it. The big thing is learning to trust automatic and not focusing on the outcome – learn to relax and let it flow. Let me know how you get on.

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Grayden Provis - June 15, 2010

“How would I play golf if I didn’t know how to play?”

Answer: like Grayden

Yep, rough weekend. Got in my way and stayed there. Trust, TRUST, T…R…U…S…T……if I say it often enough it will hopefully sink in.

Tim P: I reckon you’re on to it.

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jim harenchar - June 15, 2010

Cameron,
Still fighting my bulky putter. When it goes bad, I get in a rut with a focus on “hitting” the ball and not letting the stroke happen. It can work its way through my entire game and I get obsessed with “hitting” and can’t get back to thinking about swing and letting the ball get in the way. Thoughts and cures?

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    Cameron - June 16, 2010

    @Jim H: Stop fighting your putter. If you don’t like it throw it away. You need to become obsessed with playing automatically – learn to forget about the garbage and you’ll do fine.

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Grayden Provis - June 15, 2010

Hi Cameron

I’ve just been reading author Dorothea Brande’s advice on how to be a good writer.
Guess what? She says you have to write on AUTOMATIC because this allows the SUBCONSCIOUS to come into play and the subconscious is where the memories and stories of life are stored away and therefore where the CREATIVITY is. The CONSCIOUS mind is the CRITIC and the doubter and the FEAR monger she says – it basically BLOCKS you and stops you doing anything worthwhile. In order to write “on automatic” Brande says you need a ROUTINE……eg get up early every morning and straight out of bed start writing – at this time, she says you are “closer to your SUBCONSCIOUS” than later in the day when the rational / critical / doubting / “busy” mind kicks in. Its very important, she says, to do the routine day in day out, each time EXACTLY THE SAME.

All sounds very familiar doesn’t it? I reckon Dorothea would have become a Triber if she played golf!

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ROD DALZIEL - June 17, 2010

Cameron, if muscles don’t have memory how does anybody repeat the motion pattern of the golf swing?

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    Cameron - June 17, 2010

    @Rod D: Our brains store the motor pattern not our muscles. When you swing freely and stop thinking so much, you maximise your chances of playing your best golf. It takes a leap of faith – but once you experience the difference you’ll never go back. Thanks for posting.

    CS

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Julie Lepp - June 17, 2010

Just following on a bit further from Danny’s question about playing with a slight injury. What about when injury prevents you playing or practicing (tennis/golfers elbow in my case)? I thought I might devote some time to working on core strength, balance etc whilst I wait to get the elbow right. I guess this sort of injury is pretty common and and wondered about the experience of others here. What other things can you be doing that will bring you back as a better golfer (despite not playing)?

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Bernie Folkes - June 17, 2010

Hi Cam & all
I have thoroughly enjoyed all the questions and Cam’s responses to date. Wonderful stuff.
Cam certainly has a hard decision re the ball winners. I am thankful that it is him making the decision not me. Congrats to all ball winners, whom ever they may be.
Keep up the great work all. Happy golfing.
Bernie

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Julie Lepp - June 17, 2010

Well said Bernie – what a great blog! Thanks Cam, everyone for the great gems of insight and to the guys at vision golf, hopefully we all won here.

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