Hey, I'd like to hear your thoughts

If you’ve found this page then maybe you’re keen to find easier and better ways to improve your golf game. I think I can help you.

I’m hoping to find a tribe of like minded golfers. We’re all going to work together to have some fun, play some golf and help you play the best golf of your life.

The first step is to try and remove interruptions from your game. If you don’t know what interruptions are, then you can check out the details in my free ebook.

When you’ve read the book I’d like to hear your feedback and comments. Please do so in the space below.

I’ll be letting you know about my Golf Coaching Club soon. Keep an eye on your email for further details.

I’ll talk to you soon,

Cameron

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Cameron - December 7, 2008

Hello everyone!

These comments are fantastic. My vision of a golf tribe is coming along. I’m working on some more material that I’ll be sending you soon. Keep your eyes peeled for it!

Trevor: The forum will be available soon for discussion.
Bob: I’ve sent you the book via email
Everyone: Thanks for your efforts and contributing.

Good golfing,

Cameron

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Nathan - December 8, 2008

Hi Cameron, had a game last weekend with a clutter free mind at the ready. Couldnt get over how many 1 putts I had. normally I’m 3 putting, 2 at best. Had some good 5-8 meter putts and hardly missed anything from inside 2 meters. I noticed when I wasn’t concentrating on hitting the ball & letting my subconcience do the putting how much I was getting the sweet spot. A rare thing for me in the past. Feel great walking onto the green now, no more fear. Thanks for the help.

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Paul Campeau - December 10, 2008

cameron, I am waiting impatintly for the tribe to start. All the info that you have past onto me over the last year have help me more than anything in the previos 10. Automatic works thew best. Looking forward to joining the tribe.

thanks for the help
paul

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Robert Marshall - December 10, 2008

Cameron, finally got round to downloading e-book;puts in a nutshell what I instinctively know but,fail to carry out! Having come to golf late as a 65yr.old,spent 5 years on sand greens( good for developing chip & run ),then faced the problems of ‘real golf’-struggling on 27 handicap. I gradually reduced my handicap to 21. I had hoped to get down to 18 but lately my game has fallen apart & become erratic, mainly due to poor concentration! Because of a deteriorating spine through arthritis my long game is limited, so currently I have taken the driver out of the bag & use a 2hybrid – a bit less distance but more accurate.
My putting which was the worst part is now the best thanks to your putting e-book which compensated for the rest of the game.My short game(apart from bunkers) has been good but is starting to suffer lack of focus!
So your e-book was opportune; yesterday I tried your counting with very mixed results- when I kept focused on the ball the results were good to spectacular but sometimes the focus was on the counting with ‘interesting’ consequences! I will continue hopefully & if I can progress to a more automatic game perhaps my pleasure in the game will return & it will cease to be a chore to keep my back from seizing up. I’m not sure about joining the ‘tribe’, as I’m basically a loner,but I have been a life time believer in natural learning ( didn’t have a label for it ) and by applying your techniques improve my concentration & rid myself of so many poor shots! I have the game to play better, I just need to get rid of the clutter. Who knows I still might make an 18 handicapper or better.
I certainly would like to keep receiving your emails.
Thanks for re-firing my enthusiasm, Bob Marshall

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Cameron Strachan - December 10, 2008

Paul: I’m working on some more info and will get it to you really soon. The Tribe will start in the new year. Still working out the concept fully, but I’m getting there. I have some big plans and I can’t wait to launch it.

Robert: Thanks for your message and keep plugging away. I’ll have more info soon.

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peter crean - December 12, 2008

Hi Cameron read and enjoyed your ebook.Look forward to further instruction on how to apply your ideas into my golf game .Thanks peter

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Bruce McIntyre - December 16, 2008

Hello Cameron, I’m still relatively new to golf (nearly 2 yrs.) and have battled all of the psychological factors you so eruditely describe. Only last week, while play ing 9 with a friend and averaging 6-7 strokes per hole, and 4 putting the 5th, I said to myself, “I’m just going to forget about all this (internal self doubt, chatter etc) and play. Instantly I tee’d long drives, par’d the 6th, 7th, bogey’d the 8th and par’d the 9th, and sank a 17ft putt along the way. My friend and I realized what had happened regarding “forgetting all about this”, and the instant benefits. What had we stumbled on? And now, just out of curiosity I look in your website and here are the explanations. I don’t doubt that in time, I would have regressed to my previous frame of mind, and suffered accordingly. I’m just glad that I also stumbled across your website, because it all rings so true to my experiences so far. Please put me onto your tribal list. Best Wishes, Bruce

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Scott - December 18, 2008

hey cameron…

love the idea, im in… a bunch of choppers helping each other out, i think its briliant……
(im not being smart, and not trying to offend anyone, but i call anyone who tee’s it up a chopper, sorry!).
maybe it might help me break the rotten 7 handicap barrier……
all the best,
scott

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ray - December 20, 2008

hi cameron
just finished your ebook lot of what you say is me all over already had
four sets of clubs this year might save some money
merry xmas
Ray

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Andrew - December 22, 2008

Hi Cameron
Just finished your ebook and have found I have an enormous amount of internal chatter going on. During the week I work up to 60 hrs and then when I get on the golf course, all I think about is work. I’m still using the technique described in your perfect putting system (I actually do sing and hum a song while hitting any club). My best rounds this year was a 6 over 77 but I believe I can play better than my best ever round of 3 over 74 over ten years ago. In the last few weeks I have played absolutely shocking shooting 17 over 88. Due to work I don’t play every week but love playing golf when I can. I’m still working on the automated golf swing where I’m closing my eyes to putt when practicing putting. I’ve try this when hitting some 9 irons into the green and found it quite fun to do.
Mery Xmas
Andrew

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Arthur - December 28, 2008

Hey Cameron,
Just a quick note to say a big thank you. Deleting the interference & internal chit chat help from day one. Had my best round ever, shot a 101 with 2 pars & a birdie. Thanks heaps. Look forward to more advice & help.
Regards Arthur.

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Rod Thom - January 7, 2009

Hi Cameron,
My aim is to reduce my handicap from 25 to 21 by end 2009. To help to achieve this I need to spend more time on the golf course and put a lot of practice into my short game (chipping).
Your advise Cameron has been great as my golf is now improving and I am now starting to feel more positive & relaxed when playing.
Happy golfing in 2009.

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Peter Frost - January 14, 2009

I have been practicing but think I over did it last week. Played Par got to the course late and wasn’t in the right frame of mind. Started ok 3 par’s in 4 holes then the wheels fell off and finished 7 down. I couldn’t stop it and lost the automated swing. Thinking too much of getting back to square not swinging like I normally do and hitting the ball fat and slicing alot which I don’t normally do.

This week I have eased back on the practice and will see how I go Medal Day

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Nick - January 20, 2009

Hi tribalists,
I wrote a story (which happenend almost like that, a little “artistic” exageration supposed) and thought it fit in here. Maybe some of you got to play a round with a

„Actually“ Golfer

It’s a nice and warm Sunday. Monthly Medal. The designated winner flight tees off at 9 a.m.
Victor, a 17 year old 5 handicapper on his way to becoming a scratch player, myself, the kind of 50 year old emphatic, intellectual golfer with a 9 handicap, still using the old Ram FX-Tour set, which I bought 10 years ago and still love to play with, and the beloved, ragged and (t)rusty Cleveland 588 RTG wedges. Completing the flight is Paul, a 30 year old guest player (I’d watched him on the driving range- he has a fluid swing and hits the ball a long way) playing a 12 handicap. He carries a, now omnipresent TM Burner driver, a set of Mizuno MP blades, Vokey wedges and of a course a $ 400 Scotty Cameron Newport XYZ putter. Everything state of the art!
Victor, who laments about an actual lack of confidence in his driver, takes his 3-wood and hammers his ball near the out boundary. My drive, made with zealous nonchalance, flies into the out of bound area. I display a roguish smile. Paul (“I’m playing a Titleist 3 with red dots”), after a diligent pre shot routine, hits a 250 yards powerfade to the middle of the fairway.
Nick: “Nice drive, Paul, at least one of us hit the fairway.”
Paul: “Actually I hit it 285 with a draw.”
Is it so?
I hit a provisional ball to the fairway. Viktor plays an easy wedge to the green. My 6 iron is short of the green and Paul hooks his 8 iron outside left of the green.
“Actually I draw the ball consistently.“
Is it so?
A short pitch and 2 putts later I take with zen monkish patience a 7. Victor, already in complete despair, 3 putts for a bogey and Paul, chipping well finishes with an elegant single putt for a par. While strolling to the next tee, victor and I exchange a knowing look of anticipating, while Paul is reviewing his hooked approach shot vociferously.
„Actually!“
Paul pushes his tee shot on the second hole, a narrow par 4 with a second shot over water, and surprisingly announces that “normally I hit a draw.” After an errant second shot, he, now totally bewildered, walks to his ball, chips and 2 putts for a bogey. On the way to the next tee, Victor and I catch Paul commenting:
“I can’t believe it, where’s my draw?”
Is it so?
On the next 181 yards par 3, Paul slightly hooks his tee shot into the greenside bunker.
“Where’s the f…. draw, actually I hit it consistently.”
Is it so?
Everyone makes par.
The first par 5, it’s birdie time. Victor pushes his drive out of bounds, Paul duckhooks his into deep rough. “Goddamn, where’s the draw? Actually….”
Is it so!
I finally have found my natural rhythm and drive the ball 270 yards on the fairway. Paul is only able to hack the ball further into the rough and finally gets on the fairway facing a 200 yard 4th shot. Again hooking his 5 wood to a sand trap, and after a topped ball out of the sand, a sad chip and a frustrated putt later, he picks up his ball. “Actually I play well out of the sand.” „Par 5s actually are my birdie holes.”
Is it so?
The No.5 175 yards par 3 is well guarded by green surrounding bunkers.
Victor pulls his tap in from 2 feet after a glorious 7 iron. A solid par for me and Paul takes a further disturbing double bogey out of the greenside bunker.
Paul recounts his heroic feasts at his last tournament, where he allegedly shot an 81.
“Actually I shoot 75 to 78 in my leisure rounds.”
Is it so? Actually he’s 6 over for 5 holes.
Victor, his missed tap in still in his mind, takes, to my astonishment, his driver in his trembling hands and hooks the drive supposedly into out of bounds. With self hate driven anger he smashes his driver into the ground. Completely convinced of my effortless motion I bomb my drive to the fairway. Paul fades his drive mid fairway. “Oh my god, where’s the draw?“ Victor is still in and all of us make unspectacular pars. Hole 7 “actually” has no particular occurrences. What a pity, actually.
The green of the par 5 of no.8 is reachable in 2, “actually” a must-birdie for Paul, but he slices his drive into the woods. “Where’s my draw?”
While walking to our balls, I can’t hold back to tell Paul: “Your draw is lying, disguised as a slice, still playable near the trees.” 3 iron shots and 2 putts later Paul no longer can control his thoughts and surprisingly states that “actually I hit my irons very far.”
Is that so? Victor and I convert the putts for our must-birdies.

On no. 9, a 430 yard straight forward par4, Paul finally gets into complete despair after he had sliced his tee shot just 210 yards into the rough. “Where actually is my draw?” Victors and my ball are sitting well in the middle of the fairway just a 5 iron to the green. 3 strokes later Paul has wailed his way to the green. Lacklustre pars for Victor and me and a demolishing double bogey for Paul.

After 9 holes the situation is: Victor 2 over par, me at 4 over and Paul is lying 9 over. But:
“Actually…”

After 2 hours Victor is “actually” feeling like a scratch player and I feel like “actually” going to the Champions Tour.
After all of us hit nice drives to the 10th fairway, Paul tells me that he “actually hits draws with the driver.” Talkin’ to me, Paul?
Completely amazed by his persistence I reply: “You’re lamenting on a high level hitting the ball 260 yards to the fairway and still not being satisfied?”
After Paul hit an unsuccessful approach shot and made a mediocre chip (“Actually I chip inches to the stick”) and two putted for bogey, Victor and I decide to abandon Paul to his fate.
Before teeing off at No.11, a short par 5, Paul is tells us that “actually I haven’t made so many boogies for a long time.” Victor stares at Paul like he’s going to dance boogie woogie with him. All play pars.
No.12, the longest par 4 at 440 yards, made for players like “longhitting” Paul, but “the draw won’t appear…”
Is it so?
Victor and I are heading 30 yards in front of Paul in order to avoid listening to his audible self-commentaries, but no chance! Unmistakably we hear the echoes of: “For heavens sake, I actually know how to draw…”

The “actually golfers” are wanderers between worlds. There lies the reality with their hooked, sliced, pushed and pulled balls in front of them but doesn’t find its way to the otherworldly imagination of their swings. They live in anticipation of glorious tee shots, which divide the fairways like Moses the Red Sea. They hit their imaginary irons to unseen territories, save par like a pro from unplayable lies in the bunker, and stuff imaginary putts from 30 feet. Their playing skills are tour pro like, their ballflights are drawn by an artists hand. “Actually” they have all the shots in the bag. “Normally…”
But actuality is lying exactly in front of them, normality is mundane and isn’t seen by their eyes which only see perfection. The inconceivability and unacceptability of this reality must be altered by verbal intervention and brought back to the imaginary world. This way they shelter from their obvious failure. The “Big Bang” of imaginary golf happens when the ambitious “actually golfers” play a round with seasoned and moment aware single- handicappers. Now this is the ultimate challenge for their “imaginary golf”. Because “actually” they belong to the illustrious circle.

Paul and I (3 putt) made “boogie” and Victor made a beautiful chip and tap-in par.
Paul hits a wayward tee shot on 13. Vanishing rapidly, we can hear the obligatory “Where’s my…” Double bogey for Paul, 3- putt bogey for Victor and I fail to make my 5th attempt in a row for a birdie.
No.14, at 210 yards the longest par 3 on the course, is played without any further disturbance. Noteworthy is that Victor’s nice 5 iron is rewarded with a birdie and that it was the first green to be abandoned by Paul without commentary. (He made a par!)
No 15 is the last par 5 birdie chance is lurking, but Paul again slices his tee shot, followed by a new variation of the familiar comment. “I can’t believe it, actually I hit draws! “
After a reliable lob wedge shot I get my tap-in birdie, Victor, nodding his head in disbelief, notates a disappointing par and Paul performs some imaginary magic and scores a 7.
On No.16, a picturesque short par 3 all of us play forgettable pars.
After a (did you guess it?) yet again monster slice with the driver on 17, both us, now already running to our well placed balls, hear the cursed “actually I know how to draw…”
Pushing my 9 feet birdie putt and accepting the resulting par with stoic tranquillity and after watching Victor saving par like a pro, Paul has now arrived in the real world of his present round by making yet another double bogey.
I finish off with another pulled birdie putt with a career best round of 77. Victor shoots a 75 with a solid 2 putt and consequently wins the tournament. Paul has a happy end with a nice par finishing his round with 89 strokes.
Victor and I are sure to have “actually” played well, while Paul kindly apologizes for his constant lamentations.
The juvenile winner retires to the driving range in order to quieten his overactive forearms (some days later he mentioned that he didn’t turn is shoulders enough), while Paul at the clubhouse tells me, sipping on his “Latte macchiato”, how “actually” good he’s hitting his driver and fantasizes about “actually” he’s drawing his irons to almost perfection.
I listen with amused bewilderment.

„Actually“, Paul’s a nice guy.

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David May - January 21, 2009

Hi Cameron,
Have indeed finished the e-book found it to be right on the money. Have played incorporating some of the e-book and have had much better results. Am enjoying re reading the e-book at my leisure. Thank you.

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ciaran - January 23, 2009

hi cameron,
evrytime i put your principles into action i play great.My only problem is keeping it going on the coarse.ive been trying to focus on rythem and leting the swing flow naturally but when something goes wrong i start changing things and it only gets worse.natural play is definately hard and needs loads of practice have you any swing thoughts or routines you do to keep you focused on natural play?

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Shane Berg - January 25, 2009

Hi Cameron,

Thanks a heap for your ebook. I’m relatively new to the game (12 months) so I have been totally bamboozled by all the conflicting information not only in cyberland but also at my local club. I put your suggestions to work with my putting and it works a treat. In times past I have simply walked up to the green, took in the view, walked up to the ball, lookk at the hole and ker-plonk! So it’s like it was there all the time. However I have not experienced the same joy with my driving. I can only drive 180 metres max and I’m of a strong build. Many people say I should be hitting it 200 metres and more but I just cant seem to do it. Hope you can help with this.

Highest Regards,

Shane

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Michael Maffesoni - January 25, 2009

Hi Cameron,I have finnished your e- book and was eager to try out your idea`s.Played last wednesday and had 39 points playing of 5 handicap,1 under on the back 9.I`m 51 and have been playing for 20 years and I would have at least 20 hardcover books of instruction,eg Nicklaus,Palmer,Player,etc as well as subscribing to Aus golf digest.My most memorable round was 5 under,46 points on a windy day when the next best score was 37 points in b grade.Had 5 birdies in 6 holes on the back nine after turning 1 under and unfortunately 3 putted 17.Is there a technique for clearing your head I can use as there are that many swing thoughts in my head that I always think if one`s not working than just keep changing them till I make a good awing and then stick with that one for the rest of the round.Regards.Michael.

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Chris M - January 26, 2009

Cameron

I do love the way you teach. It all makes perfect sense when we can get over the panic of a bad shot and just trust the innate ability. After we spoke last week I went out and broke my handicap yesterday. First time in a month or so. Love the personal touch you put into everything.

Thanks for caring

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Troy - January 27, 2009

Hi Cameron

I have just taken up Golf and even before I had a chance to hit a ball my head was full of technical swing tips. I then got a copy of your ebook by chance and I was releaved to find Golf doesnt have to be complicated. After playing my first 18 practice holes yesterday I found for the first 2 holes I slipped straight into the tried and true attitudes of the group, cursing, switching technique, and finally blaming various outside influences. It was then I suddenly remembered your ebook. The first thing I did was throw away my score card, thanked the others in the group for their advice but asked if they could refrain and let me find my own way for the day. I purposly tried to halve my distance off the tee and place importance on my fairway game to the green. The remaining 16 holes were a joy and whilst some shots were a little off it generally coincided with me starting to slip into the same dynamic as the rest of the group. I dont know what my score was for the 18 but the satisfaction of each great shot I played is enough to get me hooked.

I am looking forward to applying your technique to my Motorsport as well. You would be suprised how your basic fundimentals transfer to other sports.

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Maurie - January 28, 2009

AFTER READING YOUR E-BOOK I CAST MY MIND BACK TO THE FEW TIMES I PLAYED WELL. EACH TIME I CAME OF THE COURSE I ASK “WHAT DID I DO RIGHT” JUST HIT DON’T THINK LET IT HAPPEN WAS THE ONLY THING
KEEP ME IN THE TRIBE LOOP

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Cam Strax - January 28, 2009

ciaran: Yes, it takes some practise to play naturally. You have to keep sticking to what feels natural to you. Don’t fall for the trap of jumping from tip to tip or looking for the quick fix. I have written a book that explains the automatic process in more detail Play Golf Your Way

Let me know how you get on.

Shane: Thanks for your message. Yes, there’s plenty of conflicting advice around and it can be hard to know what to do.

The driver can be difficult to master. But please keep striving for automatic with it. This is the hidden secret to more distance and accuracy.

Michael M: Check out my book Play Golf Your Way. It goes into more detail.

Chris M: Thank you and well done 🙂

Troy: I might have to put your comments on my blog. Your insights are perfect. Well done and keep up the good work.

Yes, natural and automatic learning can be applied to all sports. I have helped footballers and cricketers and applied the same ideas to tennis. Last year I had some interest from an AFL team. Think this would be a big help to an over complicated game.

Let me know how you get on with the golf and motorsport.

Maurie: Good work Maurie. Your natural game is better than anything else you’ve been doing.

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Cam Strax - January 28, 2009

ciaran: Yes, it takes some practise to play naturally. You have to keep sticking to what feels natural to you. Don’t fall for the trap of jumping from tip to tip or looking for the quick fix. I have written a book that explains the automatic process in more detail Play Golf Your Way

Let me know how you get on.

Shane: Thanks for your message. Yes, there’s plenty of conflicting advice around and it can be hard to know what to do.

The driver can be difficult to master. But please keep striving for automatic with it. This is the hidden secret to more distance and accuracy.

Michael M: Check out my book Play Golf Your Way. It goes into more detail.

Chris M: Thank you and well done 🙂

Troy: I might have to put your comments on my blog. Your insights are perfect. Well done and keep up the good work.

Yes, natural and automatic learning can be applied to all sports. I have helped footballers and cricketers and applied the same ideas to tennis. Last year I had some interest from an AFL team. Think this would be a big help to an over complicated game.

Let me know how you get on with the golf and motorsport.

Maurie: Good work Maurie. Your natural game is better than anything else you’ve been doing.

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Leonard - January 31, 2009

Hi Cameron

Thanks for the free e-books, Golf: there is an easier way; and Perfect Putting System. This is very generous of you. As a beginner and 7 lessons down the track, I can’t wait to get on the course, clear my head and see what happens. All of the instructions going round in my head are very confusing and decreasing the amount of fun. I just find golf so difficult that I forget to enjoy myself. I am looking forward to giving your advice a go.

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Andrew - February 1, 2009

Hi Cameron,
I have only started playing regularly for about a month and have improved by just playing more. I have to say I read your book and the next time I went to play, stopped worrying about my swing while I was over the ball and didn’t care if I made a mistake and I was astounded by the results. I can’t remember ever hitting my driver so sweet and so far, and straight. It was great to feel so free during my swing.I have dropped from hitting over 100 less than a month ago to hitting 93 in my first comp game yesterday. I still made mistakes but they didn’t ruin my round like they used to.

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Terry Keighran - February 5, 2009

have just read your e-book and love the straight talk – cant wait to get out and try your strategy – have only been playing since december and cant break 100 but have shot 3 birdies and 8 pars in that time so sometimes I can hit good shots but bad ones throw me – or should I say used to!

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Terry Keighran - February 10, 2009

Well tried your strategy on the weekend and freakin broke 100 for the first time – have never bettered 110 before – 1st nine 47 and back 52 – wow so stoked – went back the next day and went around the front nine in 45 not bad for a 27 handicapper yahoo

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Paul - February 22, 2009

Cameron: Thanks for the e-book and the great common-sense advice. I recognised so many of the issues that have stopped me enjoying my golf. I’ve only tried implementing your ‘interference free’ playing in my last 3 outings to the golf course and the difference has been remarkable. I’m not saying my scores have plummetted, they haven’t, but I have been comfortably playing to about 8 (2 under my handicap). The biggest change/benefit has been how much I’ve enjoyed the rounds and how I’ve been relaxed when finishing rather than stressed and exhausted.
Just one more comment – As a result of reading your book I can confirm that my short game (chipping/pitching) from 100yds in is where I’m bleeding shots. That’s my next focus when practising.
Thanks again, Paul

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Cameron Strachan - February 22, 2009

Terry: Thanks for leaving a comment. Congrats on breaking 100 for the first time. Sounds like you’re on your way to better things. Keep up the good work.

Paul: Good work. Glad you’re enjoying the process and playing better as well. There’s really no magic – just a better game without the stress and struggle.

Yes, short game is important – I’ll be adding more on that soon.

Cheers,

Cameron

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Alf S - February 23, 2009

Cam – I like what I’ve read so far in your ebooksand I will try to put your ideas into practice. My handicap (now 20) has been rising slowly as I get older and I’m finding that my short game (inside 140 metres) is probably the main cause. I once could break 90 on a sort of regular basis but I can’t seem to put a round together any more. Hoping that implementing your ideas will make a difference.

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Bob Mark - February 23, 2009

Hi Cameron, Read your E-book and the golf swing of the future .Have been playing golf since age 12 and now for about 60 years.
Had to give up due to a shoulder injury about 7 years ago on 4 handicap.Am keen to take up the game again and have been playing a few games over the last month and really hitting the ball well but keen to investigate the mental side of the game a little more closely also. I found the two books very interesting and thankfully very reasuring .Cameron,I would like to be part of the group,thanks.Since giving up golf 7years ago I took up Bowls and now am a bowls coach. As a few have already suggested these golf principles carry over to other sports and particularly to bowls. Regards Bob.

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Bob Mark - February 25, 2009

Cameron.Just a thought .Short video clips to illustrate a point submitted by the group members and sent via e-mail for comment could be incorporated into the discussion group.Bob.

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Cam Strax - February 27, 2009

Bob: Great idea. I have created a way for all those interested to write their own stuff. Thanks for the idea and please join in.

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elayne - March 1, 2009

Cameron,
I’m excited — just now reading through your books.

I have been taking weekly lessons for 2 1/2 years. I am halfway through BioSwing. I am so happy that your ideas on the swing match with my teacher’s. What you say about the transition move — he has told me all of these things, but the way you explain it is pure gold. I KNOW he understands the swing. He’s an old timer, and figured it out on his own, playing a lot with Jimmy Demaret and watching him. It is so cool to see a younger guy saying the same things. He is not familiar with the automatic principle, however, so that’s where you come into my support group.

I am familiar with Carey’s work, but had never felt confident enough in my swing mechanics to commit to it. However, people who see me on the range think my scores are 20 strokes lower than they are. So I am ready to commit to automatic, and I like the way you have presented things in Golf Your Way. As soon as I finish reading the BioSwing books, you will be hearing more from me.

Thank you!

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Cam Strax - March 6, 2009

Hi Elayne,

feel free to contact me anytime about your golf. I’m here to help and I look forward to hearing all of your news.

Thanks for supporting a “younger” guy.

Good golfing,

Cameron

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Alan Townson - March 8, 2009

Cameron
I know what you are trying to achieve and I commend you for it. I have struggled for years with tension and whilst I am improving, I know it affects all of my game. However your tip on how to cure a slice said it all for me. When I first tried it, the club went sailing high and strongly left. Even though I thought I was relaxed, I really wasn’t at the point of release.
Tips like these get to the heart of a problem where words and swing drills do not.

Thanks I shall follow your forum closely.

Regards

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Kev Cherry - March 11, 2009

I’m blown away!!When i was 21 i played off 4, without a single lesson. I felt confident in every shot, and never once considered i may fail. Driving a ball across an out of bounds to reach a par 4 was very normal.
I then decided to get lessons to improve my game. Twenty years later, at 40, i play off 3. Iv’e spent thousands on clubs and lessons, and thousands of hours blasting balls at the practice range, with no improvement, and at times, a hatred to this game i love so dearly. I have always believed that there must be a better way. Please let me be a part of this.
Kev

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ESteady - March 11, 2009

Hi Kev

I’m ESteady. This is good stuff isn’t it!

Why not join Cameron and our Tribe of like minded golfers. See 2009 Golf Challenge at top right of this page.

It would be great to have you on board.

Cheers

ESteady

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greg g - March 25, 2009

Hi Cameron
I have read your e-book and put it to work straight away.I have only been playing about 18 months and people are always telling me what a good natural swing I have however I dont seem to be improving as much as I would like.After reading the book I thought I am definatly over annalysing everything so I went back to my natural swing and just thought about hitting the ball.Much better.Played comp on monday and even with a rough start(2 points after 3 holes)I was able to brush off the bad shots and finnished with 39 points.Most importantly I realy enjoyed my round.
I would like to laern more about getting rid of the interfearence.
Regards
Greg

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RayC - March 26, 2009

Hello Cameron,
Finished reading the book and look forward to heading to the golf range to start practicing as I play and not playing as I practice. Will let you know how I get on?

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TANGO XRAY GOLF - April 27, 2009

Hi Cameron,
Had a quick read of the ebook and skimmed over the website prior to a round on Saturday, whilst my result was ordinary, I set a goal to try and remove ‘the chatter’ that you mention and had some good results on the putting green, front 9 – 12 putts from there things fell away a bit. Nonetheless I will try to apply some of your ideas, what you say makes total sense to me. Will let you know how things go.
Regards,
Todd

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Ross Clifford - April 28, 2009

Cameron you are a very talented writer. I have read with intrest your e book and look forward to putting your ideas into practice.

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Cam Strax - May 1, 2009

Thanks Ross. I’ve learned to write in exactly the same way I teach and play golf. Here’s an article that explains it in more detail. Enjoy.

Good golfing,

Cameron

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Cameron - May 1, 2009

Hi Todd,

This is the first step. Get an understanding of the auto process and learn from others. With more effort and time you’ll reach a higher level of play.

Keep up the good work.

Cameron

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Cameron - May 1, 2009

Hi Kev,

Welcome aboard. It’s time you started playing like you really want. Forget about those rules and regulations. Just let it rip and enjoy!

Cameron

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Barry Price - April 2, 2010

Cameron, i have not long ago joined the “golf tribe” & as all golfers, always looking for something to “give me the edge”. I have been a single figure handicapper for about 30yrs but had a stroke some 3 years ago & I have struggled with my game since. So far it has been more “bloody mindedness” that has not allowed the handicap to drift too far but since reading your thoughts, golf has once again become fun & the scores are starting to improve. Paralysis by analysis & playing “what if “golf has been a stumbling block for me & I think your “trust it” non-thought process can help us all. Thanks

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    Cameron - April 6, 2010

    @Barry: Thanks for posting Barry. Glad the site and information has helped you remove the paralysis. Keep in mind that this way of playing is a process not an event.

    Keep up the good work.

    Reply
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